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is the object of civil rights movement. but they never have jojo as a child. but the reader identifies with horton. he's our man can ease our guy. he is our floppy nice element -- nice elephant who is saving someone like me. but he lives in the jungle with a kangaroo give this is not the readers everyday world. --t is the world of google of hooville. that is the world of dr. seuss's child reader. it's as if horton is a mega planet saving the tiny planet earth. or maybe given the socio- specificity of hooville, the modern west. so when the mayor urges for a last voice to make the hoos h crib somestarts on a path where a tiny figure dressed in crimson stands alone. his noses in the air. there is a smirk on his face. he knows what is going on and he doesn't care. he is the kind of child who in 50 stock is cruising for a bruising. who, in 1950s talk, is cruising for a bruising. the mayor grabs the young twerp. leading him up the tower and there is a wonderful bouncing scene where jojo is on the outstretched hand of the mayor and is ready to make a big statement. he clears his throat and he
here at the law school. prior to joining aclu, he was the chief of the civil rights bureau and the office of the new york state attorney general. he spent 14 yes at the naacp legal defense fund where he supervised the litigation throughout theountry that address matters of elementary and secondary education, a formative action in higher education, and equal educational opportunit he is also the reason why sarah was able to say such nice tings about me because he was my supervisor when i was there and taught me everything that i know. he will discuss issues of racial equality, growing rights and speeches in "the year of the turtle." our seco speaker is peter nicholas. he is a officer of lot the. -- at the university of washington school of law. prior to pursuing in the law, professor nicholas was a research economist at the university of michigan and served as a member of the ann arbor cy council. he will discuss the speeches and the current battles over gay rights, same-sex marriage, the gay minority and the gay minority in the leaders of the african american community. we
in 2010, i appeared before the house judiciary subsidy committee on civil rights and civil liberties. i highlighted the numerous ways in which the internet has contributed to our economy and society as a whole. today, the impact is greater. in addition to the millions of jobs created, the internet economy accounts for only 5% of our gross domestic product according to a boston consulting group study. the internet has information an opportunity at the thinner -- fingertips of millions of users. we need updated laws to allow the ecosystem to continue to grow. on a daily basis, i see challenges created. 2010, google launched a transparency report which details the volume of requests for user data. in the last half of 2012, the number of requests google received from government agencies in criminal cases more than doubled compared to the same time in 2009. in 1986 whened electronics communications services were in their infancy. the statute no longer provides protection users reasonably expect. one example the committee may already be familiar with is from the rolls around compelled disclos
in the civil rights division and found perez gave misleading public testimony when he said in 2010 that political appointees cannot make the decisions to drop prosecution of the new black panther party members. you can read that whole story in politico this morning. to want get to your calls though on this subject of the changes in the republican party, this plan for more outreach, scheduled changes with the conventions and primary. al sect next from colorado. good morning, alec. caller: yes, good morning. i think that rand paul did really well at cpac, and marco rubio is pretty good as well. i just want to say that people like mccain, they served honorably in the military and stuff like that. however, it is time for a change, a new kind of republican party that can reach out to a lot more people. the demographics of america changed, i guess it's a little bit more moderate now. it used to be a center-right nation, and now it's probably center-left, so we probably do need to move the needle toward the center a little bit. as for rand paul, i really do like the fact that he had that
discuss their personal experiences during the civil rights movement live tonight at 8:00 eastern part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> jinger gibson is a congressional reporter with politic coe and here to talk to us about congress avoiding a shutdown but first we want to talk about what's been happening the last 18 hours on in the senate. tell us about the passing of the budget. how long did it take and why? >> the senate voted for more than 13 hours straight on the senate floor and finally arrived at 5:00 this morning on passage of a budget. the rules allow them to amend as much as they can. there are a couple of guys wanting to go until 7:00 or 8:00 this morning. luckily they stopped before that. host: for those who went to sleep at a decent hour and didn't see c-span's coverage ll night, what might they be surprised finding out what happened over night? guest: there were four that tic -- democrats voted against the democratic budget. the keystone pupe line was defeated and some amendment that is republicans were chairing that got done, things that dealt with climate change
, a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally growing up in far flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a ome. of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibility in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle just like previous generations. it means us working through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed, i may not get there with you, but i want you to know that we as a people will get to the promised land. so just as joshua carried on after moses, the work goes on for all of you. the joshua generation. for justice, and digget, for opportunity and freedom. for the jewish peopl
house says he has been the head of the justice department's civil-rights division for a number of years. president obama plans to announce the nomination this morning at the white house in the east room. c-span2 will have live coverage of that starting at 11:30 this morning. congress is set to return to capitol hill today. later this week to work on fiscal spending for the rest of this budget year and for the next fiscal year. the senate is working on the spending bill and it will be the focus this afternoon. you can see live coverage of the senate beginning at 2:00 eastern on c-span2. before the senate c-span2 will be live with carl levin. he will be at the council on foreign relations. c-span3 will be live with a discussion on the persian gulf. a more private first lady, elizabeth much growth refused to continue the tradition of making social calls to washington post political society. she spoke french inside the white house and gained a reputation of being queenly by her critics. we will see the important role she played in 1824 presidential campaign of her husband, john quincy adams
me if i am wrong, i don't recall you ever complaining about ministers who were involved in the civil rights movement or the anti-vietnam war demonstrations or about black creators who have been so involved in american politics. is it all conservative that you object to? >> no, what i object to -- [applause] >> -- what i object to is someone seeking to use his faith to question the faith of another or to use that faith and seek the power of government to impose it on others. >> at that time, diane sawyer was there. you were there. it is interesting that those two men, especially mr. mondale, agreed that you and diane sawyer could be on the panel. >> yeah and jim was the other one from "the new york daily news." >> i was certainly surprised. >> i was a reporter for "the baltimore sun" and covered the national politics. i was also, by then, i had gotten more interested in politics, and i was writing a press column for "the american spectator" magazine. >> conservative? >> conservative. and i guess the mondale people didn't recognize that. i think my questions were very fair. i like mond
fraud or fraud on wall street or public corruption or civil-rights abuses and make certain that we prioritize and make sure we are focused on the greatest threats to the american public and then to the extent toere is a determination as what the ultimate resolution is, that's up to the judge's. >> thank you. i appreciate his question. what we're going to do is introduce a bill and i will ask your comments on it, after the recess. it will be bipartisan, it will be the two of us, to set up a national commission made up of expertsrison particularly in the state's, many of them very conservative had to responde to the prison crowding more from an economic issue than any other. it will be bipartisan. we're looking for a chairman of stature or somebody who can take a year to come back and report. i think our present system is dysfunctional in the sense that very few people are working in the prisons. the prison industry program has been decimated partly because of congress. we have tried to get the bureau of prisons to adopt programs to allow them to make products that are no longer made
as important, a level playing field. we will ensure regard for civil liberties and civil rights. today, we look to our prime minister of forming his parliamentary government in the next few weeks. with on his consultations parliament's come up which is an extension of the same constitutional process that resulted in his nomination. i am very proud of this process. what we are seeing is the third way in the middle east. we now enjoy the benefits of the arab summer for us all. we have to roll up our sleeves. it will be a very bumpy and difficult road. but i look forward to the future. again, mr. president, thank you to jordan. i hope your success will continue in your visit. >> thank you very much. it is great to be back in jordan. i am glad to speak with my friend king abdullah. thank you to the people of jordan for their extreme warmth and hospitality that i remember well from my first visit as a senator. that thing i mainly remember when i came here was his majesty personally drove me to the airport. i will not tell you how fast he was going, but secret service could not keep up. nevertheless,
the civil- rights movement live from the virginia festival of the book, live tonight at 8:00 on c-span 2. >> "washington journal" continues. allison is here to discuss congressman's ethics. tell us about the role of the house and senate ethics committees. who makes the rules? house and the senate make their own rules how the ethics committee's proceed and it is different from normal committees. both of those committees are the only two committees in congress that have an equal number of democrats and republicans. when we think about how committee's work, house and the power that a chairman as about legislation or tabling things, that is not how the ethics committee works. both the chairman and a working member are supposed to work together from both parties and they are supposed to be some collegiality and agreement on how they move forward. when somebodygins makes a complaint to the committee. there is a format in which they have to do it. a member of the public and also make a complex but that will only act on it if a member of the house signed an affidavit saying this meets the standa
. >> congressman john lewis and olympic gold medalist share their experiences during the civil right movement live, saturday at 8 p.m. eastern, part of booktv on c-span 2. continues. journal" host: white house correspondent, thank you for being here. gun control. we saw a couple of things happen in the senate this week area leader reid, the head of the democrats in the senate is coming out now with a proposal, a gun bill. guest: his abilities going to of -- include the pillar his efforts, which is universal background checks. currently, it is against the law to purchase a gun if you are a criminal or have a dangerous record but not all require background checks. democrats are trying to put forward a bill that requires universal background checks. that has been the top priority for president obama. this bill will not include the assault weapons ban, which would ban certain types of high- capacity assault rifles and other weapons. there was not enough support in the senate to feel like that was possible to include and be able to pass the floor in the senate. it is a bit of a blow to the president ag
the civil rights movement live saturday at 8 p.m. eastern, part of booktv this weekend on c-span 2. difference striking between what is happening today and 100 years ago is the columnist of the parade. 100 years ago, the parade was not a parade, so much as a riot. the police refuse to protect the marchers. as they progressed, the crowds got larger and larger. they were very unruly. they had been drinking. they started to throw things at the women. they shouted and told them to go home. not just that, streetcars continued to him see people into the packed crowd the crowd got larger and larger and more aggressive. the women could not go forward. the police were not involved. the secretary of defense called out the calvary to push back the unruly crowd so that the women could continue their peaceful exercise of their first amendment rights. today, this is a wonderful peaceful assembly and as a liberation of how far have come in 100 years. >> this weekend, a look at the centennial celebration of the women's suffrage parade that took place on pittsylvania avenue in march, 1913 sunday at
fraud or fraud on wall street or public corruption or civil rights abuse. we need to make certain we are focused on the greatest revenue -- on the greatest american public. that really is in hansard are supporters of the -- in the hands of the prosecutors at the department of justice. >> what we are going to do is we are going to introduce the bill after -- and i am going to ask to your comments -- after the recess. it will be the bipartisan two of us. to set up a national commission made up of mainly prison experts, particularly in the states, many of them very conservative states. they have had to respond to the prison crowding more from an economic issue than any other. it will be bipartisan. ofare looking for a chairman stature who can come and take a year to report. i think our present system is dysfunctional and i sense there are very few people working the prisons. industry has been decimated because of congress. we tried to get prisons to adopt programs to allow them to make products that are no longer made in the united states. there are only two baseball cap manufacturers i
predicting that promise for everybody because of his life. as a civil rights attorney rightsan aide senator ted kennedy, a member of montgomery county's county council, he has helped level playing field where working families can get ahead. this is not chosen -- this is not the first time he was chosen to be a labor secretary. we have governor martin o'malley, and martin appointed, as the secretary of maryland's labor department, where heat implemented the first living wage law. le, he has open pathways for everyone willing to contribute, including people with disabilities withlbgt americans, and immigrants. while he has tackled plenty of tough issues, tom has spent a career as a consensus builder. he has worked with federal, state, and local government levels, and he understands our economy works best when the middle class and those working to get into the middle class have security they need on the job, a democratic voice in the workplace, everybody playing by the same set of word -- rules strict he will make an outstanding secretary of labor, and there are plenty of work to do. we will h
, but marriage is not a religious her right. it is a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not cover right to marry someone, except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage license. the government decides who gets married and who does not. in 1967 there was a supreme court case, loving nurses virginia and blacks could not marry whites. they challenged that. the supreme court ruled 9-0. they have rolled 14 times about the fundamental rights of marriage. from a legal standpoint, there is no argument. you can make a moral standpoint if you want, but from a legal standpoint, there is no argument we feel confident. how broadly the supreme court will roll, that we do not know. >> go to c-span.org to see the rest of that discussion. live in half an hour we will have more on this issue. we will bring you a preview of the same-6 marriage cases coming before the high court tomorrow. legal experts -- legal experts will examine the case. that will be live here on c-span starting at 4:00 eastern. president obama today called on congress to begin
partnership regime and how foreign is equivalent to civil regimes elsewhere. it is in all the rights to domestic partners. it does not give the name. we said earlier that it cannot call themselves married. they can call themselves whenever they want. >> not if they apply for a passport. >> of their married the cannot do that. >> it is a federal crime. merit on a federaler o form? -- married on a federal form? sides agree both that the word marriage matters. the gays and lesbians as a degradation of some sort of recognition. those of us supporting to a traditional marriage see the word marriage draws on its that is tiedole to procreation and child rearing. we want men and women to understand that marriage is the ideal context in which to raise children, and in a sense to read the fine marriage in a way that eliminates the essential components. >> you have a bunch of people out there raising children right now cannot get married. if you think marriage is an important thing to happen your parents, if you think they would benefit from having unmarried parents. hawthorne and they have all
of the olympic medalist don carlos discuss their personal experiences during the civil-rights movement live at the virginia festival of the book, saturday at 8:00 eastern, part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> on washington journal, we spoke with members of congress about the federal budget. we heard from house budget committee vice-chairman tom price and jerrold nadler. this is an hour. host: now joining us is representative tom price, vice chair of the budget committee. also a member of the ways and means tax writing committee. if you would, start by bringing us up to date on where the house is when it comes to the continuing resolution to the 2014 budget. guest: the budget was passed out of the house a couple of weeks ago. the senate has been dealing with that. is the pathanding that last evening. it is back in the house and people like the past that today. it is good news. one of the things we included with the approach with spending reductions. the budget is an exciting activity that is been on the house floor these past two days. we will likely pass that out of the house of repr
that trade agreement awaiting not deal with people that violate civil rights. exit code needs to clean their act up and they need to be -- mexico needs to clean their act up and they need to be put into a position where they have to help to clean up the border. .uest: debbie is right mexico has tremendous internal problems and i go into el paso, where people are talking with people that go in the car -- go across the border, and i am hearing from mexican citizens that they are trying to clean up the mess in their country. that would stabilize it. trade from the u.s. to mexico is on the uptake right now, so there are positive things happening, but it is an unstable region. host: a quick question about gun control -- the new york -- the "new york times" this morning saying that the colorado governor as a long path to gun limits. as the cochair of the western falcon -- caucus, what do you make of a western state governor looking like he will sign pieces of legislation? guest: i try to be german not to -- driven by not what will catch the voters, but by principle. the 1994 to 2004 they had
, whether that be a mortgage fraud, fraud on wall street, public corruption, or civil rights abuses. we need to make certain that we prioritize, make certain we are focused on the greatest threats to the american public, and to the extent there is a determination as to what the ultimate resolution of an investigation or case is, that is in the hands of the prosecutors of the department of justice. >> thank you. i appreciate his question. what we're going to do, we're going to introduce a bill --i'm going to ask your comments on that -- after the recess. it is going to be bipartisan. we will set up a national made up of mainly prison experts, particularly in the states, many of them very conservative, some liberal, who have had to respond to the crowding, the prison crowding, more as an economic issue than any other. it will be bipartisan. we're looking for a chairman or somebody of stature who can take a year and come back and report. i think our prison system is dysfunctional in the sense that very few people working in the it has beenstries, decimated, partially because of the congress. we
social issues of our time. including the movement for civil rights. archbishop, leader of the greek orthodox church of america, carried that commitment forward when he marched alongside martin luther king jr. in selma, alabama, in 1965. an iconic photograph of those two great leaders appeared on the cover of "life" magazine. the historical relationship of these two proud communities embodies the greatness of america. on march 25 when we celebrate greek independence day, we salute all those who have struggled for freedom and rededicate ourselves to ensuring that america remains a symbol of fairness and opportunity the world over. i rise today also to mourn the passing of legendary greek american andrew a. athens of chicago. andy lived a life that few could match. he enlisted in the u.s. army in january of 1942 and fought at the famous battle of elal amean in egypt. he obtained the rank of captain and in 1945 was honored with the bronze star and u.s. army commendation medal for his outstanding military service. andy went on to become a successful businessman and walked with kings and
lewis and olympic gold medalist giancarlo discussed their personal experiences during the civil rights movement. saturday at 8:00 p.m. eastern, part of "booktv" on c-span2. "washington journal" continues. , at: jerrold nadler democrat of new york, a member of the progressive caucus. representative nadler, in the back toward budget proposal which was voted on yesterday in the house, you say that 7 million new jobs and go one year will be created if the congress and the president would adopt your budget. it would reduce unemployment to nearly five -- two near 5% and three years. it would reduce the deficit by $4.4 trillion over 10 years. and it would strengthen medicare and medicaid amah and you'd be asking the wealthy to pay their fair share. -- medicare and medicaid and you would be asking the wealthy to pay their fair share. guest: the institute of policy analysis estimated that you are spending money on infrastructure. we have a to point to dollar trillion infrastructure deficit, according to the transportation -- american society of civil engineers. building roads, highways, bridges
security act of 1935. they were instrumental in the civil rights act of 1964, and their support for world war ii was unmatched in making sure we had workers to deal with what we needed to back home while we had so many people fighting for our country overseas. those are just some of the efforts, but there's more. part of being a part of organized labor has meant so much for this country. if you are a union member, let me just offer a few of the things that you're more likely to have because you're part of a union. one, you will earn higher wages. union members earn 30% more than their nonunion counterparts so you'll have a better chance at a living wainl, the ability to support your -- wage, the ability to support your family because you are part of an union. you will have more on-the-job training. workers are likely to have formal on-the-job training making employees more skilled and adding to productivity. and something i should mention and i should mentioned from the beginning, i have been a small business owner for 25 years, over half of my lifetime. i opened a small business when i h
of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity -- a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations, this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution, while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me, personally, growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a home. [applause] of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle, just like previous generations. it means us working through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed, "i may not get there with you. but i want you to know that we, as a people, will get to the promised land." (applause.) so just as joshua carried on after moses, the work goes on for all of you, the joshua generat
. religious social service groups, civil rights groups to help the naacp, hispanic groups stepping forward. the hispanic caucus should take a much more forward issue. it needs to be replaced with assertive stand up for millions of american workers who are sweating it out on sweat labor. host: ralph nader, the calls are lining up. there, glad you are out think you're doing great work. even though as a republican i disagree with most of what you say, i think the free market has to increase the minimum wage. i particularly did not like the way the you say that the workers are doing twice the work that they were doing 30 years ago, your statistics, i do not know. just because you are doing twice the work, there is not a reason for that, it does not mean that they are running around more. i am not getting twice when i got paid when i started. i am 100% with the with c l's making too much money not being market-driven, i think that is where the energy should go. the other end will take care of itself, if you can figure out some way, and i hope you do, break down those crazy wages for the c o's.
for liberty and human dignity. a tale that was carried from slavery and the civil rights movement into today. for generations that helped people persevere and holding on to hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally, growing up in different parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke for a yearning for every human being for home. [applause] of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and the gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also now that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle. just like previous generations have. it means us working through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed "i may not get there with you, but i want you to know we as a people will get to the promise land." [applause] so just as joshua carried on after moses, the work goes on for all of you, the joshua generation for justice and dignity and opportunity and freedom. for the jewish peop
, although you obviously have to do it repeatedly, someone can sue you in civil court. oute was a case that came in favor of the plaintiff. >> so someone could buy one right now? get a certification from the faa? >> not really. and you could buy something like a parrot ar for $300. it is a vehicle you comply by your ipad. more than likely you will not get sued over that in all likelihood. the faa does bay and the commercial use of drones today but that is set to be relaxed in 2015. then we will have an economic incentive. i think this will be a wonderful thing. i think this technology is deeply transformative. i sent they are basically applying smart phone. went to we are never get there unless we place limits and domesticate this problem of privacy because of our reaction from a we are not going to avail ourselves to technology. like card last names. i can relate to you. youwould free -- how would relate to that? >> right now we're seeing already without commercial operators being able to legally operate drones, rising every week or month i hear a story of the faa trying to shut down
in southern afghanistan and eastern afghanistan. the same was true in the period after the destructive civil war for a costly war from 2006 to 2008. iraqis began together -- iraqis came together. >> a gentleman right here. >> ticket. -- thank you. since the president is taking his first foreign trip to the middle east, how do you see his policy and can he achieve something in his second term? >> i'm hoping to keep the focus on the big question before us, which is the lessons of a decade of war. general that the mentioned how war does not often turn out the way you want it to, as the air battle concept would be too much towards. how owards that direction, did that shift resources away from europe and asia in the 2000's? >> you said regarding one of the, with in history, 3 packets of a regime but they were doing this for 3 decades. it's only in the end that the u.s. learned of weapons. the regime was brutal all the time. >> we have the whole world on a table. onhow has our expenditures iraq affected our ability to operate elsewhere? the united states is the number one superpower. we have the l
- based privacy standards to ensure that individual rights and civil liberties are protected. >> thank you. i will submit a question for the record. i would appreciate if you would respond. you talked about supreme court cases regarding the of aerialonality surveillance. do you believe that body of supreme court cases are adequate for guarding the courts and law enforcement in the area of unmanned surveillance? i think theyure are adequate for purposes of man surveillance. with unmanned surveillance, there is an additional danger that as costs go down you see more. i am not sure that they are adequate. they need to be updated. >> inc. you very much. >> the supreme court has held observations made by while following a maned aircraft over a person's property does not violate the fourth amendment. conductere allowed to surveillance over private property at heights ranging from 400 feet to 1000 feet. low must a joan fly over a low mustrophecy -- hwopow prorone fly over private perty. were to if a drone trespass, that would trigger the fourth amendment. it used to be that you own all of the air
to try to bring about a resolution in syria that the rights and the safety and security of all regardless of whatever lines divide syria. this is not easy. when you start seeing a civil war and you have a repressive government that is intent on you haveng power, missed trust that has broken and there is an opposition that has not have the opportunity our time to both politically and militarily, then you see the devastation you have been seeing. we're doing everything we can to prevent it. i know the vast majority of international art nurse feel the same way. >> from the white house press corps. reuters. >> thank you. there were some friendly banter between the two of you on the tarmac. how much of a serious matter did that become in talks? president obama has said it will take iran at least a year to build a bomb. the is much longer than prime minister believes. mr. president, are you asking the prime minister to be more patient and hold off for at least a year on military action against iran? esther prime minister, has president obama's words convince thethat he is putting forth military
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)